GEORGE LONG

The Tales of a Blair Family    

October 16, 1915: Tribune-Republican: Meadville, Pa;

AGED MAN GROUND TO DEATH UNDER WHEELS OF TROLLEY

GEORGE LONG, OF WOODCOCK TOWNSHIP, KILLED FRIDAY NIGHT BY CAMBRIDGE CAR AT FOUNTAIN HOUSE-- RETURNING FROM VENANGO AND FELL BEFORE CAR AS IT WAS STOPPING FOR HIM.

    George Long, aged between 65 and 70 years, better known as "Fiddler George," was struck and instantly killed about 11 o'clock Friday night by a trolley car enroute to Cambridge Springs. The accident occurred at the Fountain House, about four miles from Meadville.
    The car, with F. H. Leslie as conductor and George W. Thompson motorman, left Meadville at the usual hour, and about 20 minutes later phoned to the Meadville office of the company that the car had struck and killed a man. Coroner W. E. Byham was at once notified and together with Dr. R. B. Gamble and a Tribune-Republican reporter, left for the Fountain House on a special car.
    Long was dead when the special arrived, having been almost instantly killed. The forward trucks had passed completely over the middle of the man's body and in addition had broken the left arm in several places.
    An examination of the motorman and conductor disclosed the fact that the car had been moving slowly. Long, it was stated by the motorman, was first seen standing about two feet from the track, facing the rails and signaling in a manner with his

arms that he wanted to board the car. Motorman Thompson applied the air and was just coming to a stop when Long evidently caught his foot or slipped and pitched forward onto the rails. The motorman reversed the car, but was unable to stop.
    Joseph Balliet, Lynn Gilmore, Edward J. Muckinhaupt, Murray McCullough, Frank H. Osborne, and John L. Laley were impaneled as a Coroner's jury and viewed the remains, also taking the testimony of the motorman, conductor, and neighbors of Long. The formal inquest was fixed for Monday evening at 7:30 o'clock at the undertaking rooms of Frank M. Hunter, at Saegertown, where the body was removed.
    Mr. Long is survived by three sisters, Miss Margaret, at home; Mrs. Wm. Davison and Mrs. Chas. Johnson of Ripley, New York, and one brother, Albert, of near Saegertown. The dead man had lived with his sister on the old homestead between Blooming Valley and Saegertown for years, and was well known in the community.

 

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